Friday, November 27, 2015

just a thought

'Flora' necklace 18-22" long  sterling silver
paper, ink, graphite, watercolor, mica;
Kathleen Faulkner

It is the Season.  

Today is 'Black Friday'.  
People are rushing in hoards to the big box stores.  

There is an alternative:
Support your local artists, craftsmen, galleries, 
independent book stores and shops.
Consider spending locally and let's keep the money in our communities.

  Here's wishing you a stress free and joyous Holiday Season!

Saturday, November 21, 2015

Field Work

'Field Work' 36x32" oil on canvas;  Kathleen Faulkner

There are a lot of contributors to the well being of a field.
good dirt full of life

The same holds true for most things.

Sunday, November 15, 2015

Cloud Catcher

'On Any Given Day'  18x32" oil pastel, charcoal;  Kathleen Faulkner

As one travels north along the water around here one can see Lummi in many different poses.  Usually there is a cloud capping the top.  Sometimes fog turns it mysterious.  Whatever the weather, that volcanic looking mountain is always there.

i.e. gallery presents:

The singular power of Lummi Mountain 
and how its presence plays out in the art of northwest artists

Ed Kamuda
Clayton James 
David Kane 
Toni Ann Rust
David Hall
Louise Kikuchi
Max Emminger
Chris Wardenberg-Skinner
Jef Gunn
David Blakesley
Karen Hackenberg
Margy Lavelle
Kathleen Faulkner

November 20th - December 27th, 2015
Artist's reception
Saturday, November 21st, 5-8 pm

5800 Cains Court
Edison, WA 

Wednesday, November 11, 2015

The ocean's rainbow

'Pearl' earrings 1" diameter, sterling silver, paper, gouache,
watch glass lenses; Kathleen Faulkner

It is said that health and longevity follow those who wear pearls.

 The oldest known gem is a pearl dating back to around 520 B.C.  It is on display in the Louvre Museum in Paris. 

Knights going into battle would wear pearls as a symbol of strength and spirit, courage and protection.

The sheen is called orient luster.
a lush organic gem

Sunday, November 1, 2015

The forest thanks the great Rain God

'Cumulus' earrings, 1" diameter  sterling silver, paper, gouache,
watch glass;  Kathleen Faulkner

The clouds have returned to the Northwest. 
With that comes rain.  

We are most grateful.

Thursday, October 8, 2015

Here it is.

Poem: Anne McDuffie, brooch/pendant  Kathleen Faulkner,
Photo of brooch:  Larry Bullis

'Branch' Anne McDuffie

This says it.

'Signs of Life' journal cover, neckpiece
Kat Cole,  Facere Jewelry Art Gallery

Friday, October 2, 2015


'Trillium' brooch 2" diameter, sterling silver, gouache,
paper, glass lens,  Kathleen Faulkner

My family spent a lot of time in wilderness.  That was a long time ago when there was a lot more wild.

I remember finding trilliums in the woods and being thrilled:  the Find.  Now one can buy the plants at nurseries and plant them in the shady part of the yard.  

Times change.

Friday, September 25, 2015

Here is my Excitement:

North wall, Skagit Valley College Gallery; photo: Ellen Michael

South wall, Skagit Valley College; photo: Ellen Michael

This show at Skagit Valley College is currently up now through October 30, 2015.  
I am happy to be there.  

Poster for the show;
photo:  Ellen Michael

Sunday, September 20, 2015

Life of a bird.

'Indicator Species Series:  Whooping Cranes' post earrings,
1.5" diameter, sterling silver, paper, ink, watercolor, colored
pencil, mica;  Kathleen Faulkner

Whooping cranes are the tallest North American birds.  They're named after their sound, they can live up to 30 years and they are endangered.
Because of unregulated hunting and loss of habitat, at one time, there were as few as 21.  Now, thanks to conservation efforts, there is a limited recovery:  around 437 as of 2011.

Whooping cranes are an indicator species of wetland health.  

“Here is your country. Cherish these natural wonders, cherish the natural resources, cherish the history and romance as a sacred heritage, for your children and your children's children. Do not let selfish men or greedy interests skin your country of its beauty, its riches or its romance.”
― Theodore Roosevelt

Sunday, September 13, 2015

It's a what?

'Indicator Species Series: Mussels'  2.5" diameter, sterling
silver, paper, colored pencil, mica;  Kathleen Faulkner

'An indicator species is any biological species that defines a trait or characteristic of the environment.  For an example, a species may delineate an ecoregion or indicate an environmental condition such as a disease outbreak, pollution, species competition or climate change.  Indicator species can be among the most sensitive species in a region, and sometimes act as an early warning to monitoring biologists.'  

Here is a short list:

Mussels, clams and oysters are susceptible to toxins, pollutants and minute changes in environmental conditions.
Mosses often indicate acid soil.
The northern spotted owl indicates old growth forests.
Lichens are indicators of low air pollution.
Tubificid worms are indicators of sewage seepage. (does Victoria, Canada have an abundance of these?)
Adult frogs and toads absorb through their skin and are indicators of water pollution.
Salmon are an indicator species for wetland ecosystems
Non-Alaskan grizzly bears are indicators of mountain ecosystems, measuring the health and diversity of the ecosystem.
In the pacific northwest, the environmental health of estuaries is monitored by the indicator species of eel grass.  
Kelp is a foundation species and can be used as an indicator of other species occurring in the environment.

Maybe this is something you'll give a little thought to as you go about your day.

Tuesday, September 8, 2015

Did you know?

'Indicator Species Series: Illuminated Kelp'
18 - 20" chain, 2 - 2.5" diameter discs
Neckpiece, sterling silver, paper, gouache,
watercolor, glass lenses;  Kathleen Faulkner

Sunday, August 23, 2015

Life as we know it.

'A Red Herring' 2x4" brooch, sterling silver, paper, gouache,
watercolor, mica;  Kathleen Faulkner

So many distractions and so little time.

I'm grateful to be focused on art these days; It took a long time to get here.  
Life's been a roller coaster ride.

Sunday, August 16, 2015

Signs of Life

'Indicator Species Series: Northern Spotted Owl'
4x3" Brooch/Pendant, gouache, paper, mica,
sterling silver,  Kathleen Faulkner; photo by
Larry Bullis

I am invited to be in the show, 'Signs of Life' at Facere Jewelry Art Gallery in Seattle October 7th through the 27th, 2015.
This show features the work of nine jewelry artists, each paired with a writer picked by the gallery. The journal, 'Signs of Life' combines stories with jewelry art and is in conjunction with the exhibit.

 I don't know yet, who the writers are.  I'm really looking forward to it all.

Wednesday, August 12, 2015

kelp beds

'Kelp Beds' 4x3' STEAMROLLER print on
fabric;  Kathleen Faulkner

I read a lot of science fiction when I was a kid.  It allowed me to consider miracles. 

Here's to the kelp beds, the salmon and bear
and to all species non human.

Here's to the wild!  
May it live on forever!

Sunday, July 26, 2015

New Life

'Just North of Here' 18x24" oil pastel, charcoal;  Kathleen Faulkner

I hear there are kestrel fledglings just north of here.  
I haven't seen them yet but I know the area:  
lots of mud.  

Life in the marsh.

Sunday, July 19, 2015

almost there

in progress 4x3' linocut;  Kathleen Faulkner

I'm almost finished with the linocut.  The fish and some clean up are all that is left.  
Information on this project can be found here, and in this video by Jef Morlan:

Anacortes Arts Festival 2011

Sunday, July 5, 2015


in process 4x3' lino;  Kathleen Faulkner

The Anacortes Arts Festival is coming up.  A group of us will be printing 3x4' linoleum blocks using a steamroller during the festival.  This year is different in that we will be printing on fabric.  They will look good as banners.
Friday I will be printing mine.  Saturday and Sunday I will be in the print booth helping others make their own smaller version.  Maybe I'll see you there.

Sunday, June 28, 2015


in process: linocut 4x3'  Kathleen Faulkner

It's almost time for  STEAMROLLER PRINTMAKING!  

Anacortes Arts Festival has, once again, invited a group of artists to participate in this fun event.  This will be our third year.  We will be printing all three days: August 7th through the 9th, 10 to 5pm down by the port dock on Commercial Ave.  It's quite a sight to watch.

As you can see, I have a lot left to do.  I'd better get to work!

Sunday, June 21, 2015

coming up

'After the Rains' 16x20" oil pastel, charcoal;  Kathleen Faulkner

I am so pleased to announce two shows in July.

Becky Fletcher, Chris Theiss and I will be showing at Smith Vallee Gallery in Edison, WA July 3rd through the 26th, opening July 11th, 5-8pm.   

Also, I am honored to be showing with Margy Lavelle, Allen Moe, Heidi Epstein and Michael Clough  in 'Convergence: 5 Skagit Artists' at the Virginia Inn in Seattle, WA.  The show runs July 2nd through the month of August.  The opening is July 2nd, 5 - 8pm.

'Rockweed'  12x12" oil pastel;  Kathleen Faulkner

'Flex'  12x12" oil pastel;  Kathleen Faulkner 

'Barnacles' 12x12"  oil pastel;  Kathleen Faulkner

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Bone Food

Earrings, calcite, sterling silver; Kathleen Faulkner

Once upon a time, while hiking up in the northern New Mexico mountains,  we came upon an old calcite mine.  It had been closed for years but the rock was scattered everywhere.  The sun, filtering through the trees, and a slight breeze made those rocks sparkle.
I felt like I was in a dream as I sat on the ground picking up pieces of rock.  The day, the sun, the smells of pine and pinion and all these beautiful stones sparkling like diamonds..

Calcite comes from the shells of dead marine organisms.  That means that at one time, long ago, that area in Northern New Mexico was ocean.  
Many things have come from those bones of the dead:  cement, limestone, marble, medicines, fertilizer and the most amazing of all:  lenses.  The now extinct trilobite used clear calcite crystals to form the lenses of their eyes.  

All that and more from shells.  

Imagine what we haven't discovered yet 

what we don't know.

Sunday, June 14, 2015

stick it

'Branching Out'  brooch 7x3" coral, sterling silver;
Kathleen Faulkner

I found several odd shaped branches and wondered what I should do with them.  
One thing led to another and, before I knew it, I had a slew of stick pins.  Then I decided to draw the sticks.  Then I remembered this piece of coral.  

I guess you could say that I'm branching out.

'Stick' pins various sizes, wood, sterling silver;
Kathleen Faulkner

'Stick' pin gouache, mica,
sterling silver;  Kathleen Faulkner

'Stick Pin, Too'  gouache, mica
sterling silver;  Kathleen Faulkner

Sunday, June 7, 2015

we are all salmon people

'Something's Fishy'  brooch, 2x3" sterling silver, gouache, pigment,
ink,  mica;  Kathleen Faulkner

I remember standing on the bank of the John Day river watching the salmon heading home.  
There were so many that I imagined I could walk across them to the other side.

Things are different now. 

Sunday, May 31, 2015


'Riparian Rhapsody'  12x12" oil pastel,  charcoal;
Kathleen Faulkner

Low tide

The ducks move about on the mud so effortlessly 
but they leave their mark. 

It's a long poem.

Sunday, May 24, 2015

here's mud in your eye

'An Early Summer' 12x12" oil pastel, charcoal;  Kathleen Faulkner

About Mud:

mud / med
*n. soft, sticky matter resulting from the mixing of earth and water.

Other words for mud include slobber, mire, ooze, muck, silt, slabber, slutch, lutulence, sloshiness and slushiness.

Mycobacterium vaccae, found in mud, is thought to be an anti-depressant.

Mice fed with mycobacterium vaccae from mud can navigate mazes twice as fast as usual.

and, never forget:

"He who slings mud generally loses ground."  Adlai E Stevenson

Sunday, May 17, 2015


'Edison Slough'  36x24" oil pastel, charcoal;
Kathleen Faulkner

early morning  earlier than usual
 The fog hangs low but the temperature is warm.

This used to be the Samish River.

Sunday, May 10, 2015

black is the new green

'Fertile Field' 14x18" oil pastel, charcoal;  Kathleen Faulkner

One can always tell the roundup fields from the others.  Everything is orange.  

This one is deep and dark ready to feed us and no harm done.
I've been thinking a lot about this field, so black and fertile.  

After awhile, one's environment starts having an impact.  

Sunday, May 3, 2015

a dirty story

'Mudflats II'' 16x20" oil pastel, charcoal;  Kathleen Faulkner

We don't really talk about it but it's always there.
a refuge
it has magic

There are bones, shells and feathers, 
reeds mixing with the mud 
and long views.

the day, the time, the season 
this all keeps it interesting

Sunday, April 26, 2015

fields of dreams

'Along the Dike' 16x20" oil pastel, charcoal;  Kathleen Faulkner

My time in Edison is giving me a new perspective.  

I'll never see fields the same again. 

'Flooded Field' 16x20"  oil pastel, charcoal;  Kathleen Faulkner

Monday, April 20, 2015


in progress 16x20" each, oil pastel, charcoal;  Kathleen Faulkner

I've been spending a lot of time around Edison lately.
Those fields have their own special magic  
the colors, the birds

There is something to be said for being able to see 
far off into the distance.

Saturday, April 4, 2015


It is an inspired journey from the west side heading east.  
We are blessed.
We have it all.

'On the West Side'  16x18" oil pastel;  Kathleen Faulkner

'Tree' 10x8" oil pastel, medium;
Kathleen Faulkner

'Tree, Too' 10x8" oil pastel, medium;
Kathleen Faulkner

'Palouse Lake' 18x16" oil pastel;
Kathleen Faulkner